T Sentence Speech Games
Carryover of Progress Happens Here!

Welcome to Sentence Level Games for T.  Yeah!

Throw away your cards because when your child sees "speech flashcards," he or she goes in to "speech mode." In "speech mode," your child remembers to say T correctly. However, when your child is not in "speech mode," he or she may not say the sound right.

Therefore, your child now must work on T during more "natural" games. This is how we transition all the great progress made so far into automatic, everyday speech!

I created games that naturally contain T words. To be successful with these games, make sure to incorporate as many T sentences as possible. Also, give appropriate verbal, visual, and tactile cues as needed.

My Best Practice Tips:

1. Remind your child that you are going to play a game and practice T at the same time. Everyone has to remember to use their good T sound! I like to do a quick "warm-up" and repeat a few T words for practice.

2. Introduce the target sentences and then practice them with your child before starting the game.

3. Incorporate as many repetitions of the target sentences as possible.

4. Make sure you, the parent, take turns during games. You have the opportunity to model the target sentence which has the power to accelerate the process.

5. Don't forget to give appropriate verbal, visual, and tactile cues as needed.

Lastly, remember to have fun!!


Functional Games


Tag

Target Sentence

Tag, you're it!

How to Play 

One person is "it." This person chases the other players and tries to tap them on the back. When the "it" player tags a person, he/she says "tag, you're it!" Remember to cue for correct productions of /t/.

Example Script

  • Parent: Let's play tag, you're it (parent taps child on back)
  • Child: (Chases parent and little sister and touches sister on back) Tag, you're it!
  • Parent: Great /t/ in the word “it!” Okay, your sister is “it” now.
  • Etc...


Bath Time

Target Phrase

____ in tub

How to Play

Before bath, take turns with your child washing a few toys first. To do so, throw each toy in the tub, one at a time. While throwing the toys, say the sentence ____(name of toy) in tub. As a bonus, once your child is in the bathtub, be aware of the words “tub” and “water” as they are used frequently. Cue for correct productions of /t/ as needed. 

Example Script

  • Parent: Let's wash a few of your friends. First, horse in tub (throws horse in tub).
  • Child: Cat in tub (throws cat it tub)
  • Parent: Good T sound. Dog in tub (throws dog in tub).
  • Child: Wash giraffe in tub!
  • Etc...


Bath Time 2

Target Sentence

Pour water

How to Play

During bath time, grab some cups and take turns pouring water. Say "pour water" before taking a turn.

Example Script 

  • Parent: What do you want to do? (asks while holding a cup)
  • Child: Pour wager! 
  • Parent: Try again. Remember “tongue front” when saying water.
  • Child: Water 
  • Parent: Good job! (gives child cup to pour water)
  • Child: (pours water)
  • Parent: (takes cup back and waits if child will say “pour water” without a prompt)
  • Child: Pour water please!
  • Parent: Great /t/. Here you go. (gives child cup). 


Let's Count!

Target Sentences

The sentences will change but be aware of the words "two," "eight," and "ten."

How to Play

Count anything to 10. This game can be played all day long in short bursts. Your child can count the number of cheerios at breakfast, number of marbles while playing a game, number of steps to the car, number of birds in the sky, etc...

Example Script

  • Parent: Wow, you collected a lot of rocks. How many do you have?
  • Child: One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, and then. 
  • Parent: Good counting. Let's say "ten" again. Tongue behind teeth.
  • Child: Ten.
  • Parent: Good job!


Little One

Target Sentence

This one is little

How to Play

Almost anything has a little version of itself. For example, there are big and little blocks, toys, pieces of chicken, socks, pants, crayons, etc... When interacting with your child, ask him/ her which one is little. Encourage your child to answer using the phrase "this one is little" to practice /t/ at the phrase level. It is recommended to “play” this game in short bursts. 

Example Script

  • Parent: Help me with the laundry. Find all the little socks.
  • Child: This sock is little.
  • Parent: Good job, find some more.
  • Child: This one is little.
  • Parent: Good /t/ and good job being a great helper.

*The /t/ in "little" will sound somewhat like the /d/. That is okay and normal.


Eat!

Target Sentence

Eat_______

How to Play

Find a puppet or stuffed animal and some pretend food. If you don't have pretend food, make some with paper and crayons. Have your child tell the puppet what to eat.

Example Script

  • Parent: The bear is hungry (opens the puppet’s mouth)
  • Child: Eat a strawberry (feeds bear a plastic strawberry)
  • Parent: Yummy! The bear is still hungry...more please!
  • Child: Eat a banana (feeds bear a banana)
  • Etc..


Teacher Game

Target Sentence

Write a _____

How to Play

Get out a piece of paper and something to draw with. Next, take turns with your child being a teacher. Tell each other what to write. If your child doesn't know how to write letters, you can have him/her draw shapes or anything! The key here is to say "write____" before each turn. 

Example Script

  • Child: My turn to be the teacher. Write the word dog
  • Parent: (Parent writes the word "dog")
  • Child: Now write the word "cat."
  • Etc....


Hat Game

Target Sentences

This will depend on the game. Some examples: Hit hat, Put hat on, Throw ball in hat

How to Play

Find a few hats. Take  turns with your child telling one another to "put hat on." Another ideas is to turn a hat upside down on the floor. Take turns trying to throw a ball into the hat. Before each turn, say the sentence "hit hat" or “throw ball in hat.” 

Example Script

  • Parent: My turn, hit hat (throws ball into hat) First basket!
  • Child: My turn, hith hath (child throws ball into hat) Two baskets!
  • Parent: Great job but remember tongue behind teeth for /t/. Try again.
  • Child: Hit Hat (throws ball again into hat)
  • Parent: Great /t/ and we have two baskets!


Meals

Target Sentences

Treat, Sweet, Eat, Eating, Butter, Batter, Taco, Turkey, Toast, Chocolate, Table

How to Play

This is not a game at all. Instead, be aware of all the /t/ words you or your child might say during meals. A sticker or tally system for every /t/ word pronounced correctly may be good motivation to remain concentrated for an entire meal. See if your child can beat their previous record!

Example Script

Will depend on each meal!


Quick Printing


What's Next


You've made it! If you want some more practice, check out some language worksheets.


› Functional Games