Child Language Colors

Colors Page Has 2 Sections:


If this is your first time, please read the introduction. It is necessary! If you have been here before, jump down to the games and download your copies.

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Introduction & Screening


By 3 years of age, your child should be able to identify and name colors. If not, there are simple ways to learn this skill throughout the day. Below, I give ideas on how to work on colors!

To find your child’s baseline, see if your child can name or point to the colors below. 

If your child is having difficulty naming or pointing to any of the colors above, read through the games below. Pick a game that your child may be interested in and give it a try! 

If your child already knows colors, the games below work on many different language skills besides colors. Therefore, you can still “play” them to reinforce colors as well as practice other language skills. 

What’s Included:

  • 4 Activities to develop following direction skills
  • Easily printable handouts
  • Space provided to make notes, ask questions, etc...

Recommended Use:

  • Pick an activity and print it out. 
  • Place the activity in a frequented spot to help remind yourself to try it out for a few days. 
  • Jot down some notes on what seems to work and what does not.

Note - Even if your child knows these concepts, play the games anyway! These games also expose your child to new vocabulary as well as practice following directions.  

Color Games


1. Color Day

The idea of a “color day” is very beneficial because your child is able to learn about a color and then transfer the skill across settings. 

How To Play

Pick a color and then make it a “(name of color) day.” In the morning, tell your child what color is the “color of the day.” Then, throughout the day, find this color and discuss it with your child.

Let’s do an example: "Blue Day"

  • Find blue on your clothes
  • Point out the blue sky 
  • Get excited when you see a blue car in the street
  • Find all the blue things in a book
  • Etc... 

Language Skills Targeted

  • Colors
  • Vocabulary
  • Following Directions
  • Attention to Task

I like the idea of a “color day” because your child is able to learn about a color and then transfer the skill across settings. Encourage your child to spot the color (not just you!)

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2. Laundry

What You Need

Dirty clothes (this one should be a cinch)

How To Play

This one is very easy to do! Have your child help during laundry and talk about colors. Done! Below are some ideas to try. 

Ideas to Try

  • Organize socks into colors.
  • Make a red pile, blue pile, green pile, etc… of clothes
  • Name colors as you fold clothes
  • Have your child name what color to find next to fold and vice versa

Language Skills Targeted

  • Colors
  • Categorization

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3. Blocks

What You Need

Any type of building blocks

How To Play:

Sit down with your child and get out his/her favorite building blocks. Start playing together and then pick an idea from the list below. Naturally weave color practice into play.

Ideas To Try

  • Categorize blocks by color.
  • Name a color and then help your child find all the blocks that contain that color. 
  • Name the color of a block before adding it to a tower.
  • Make color "towers."

Language Skills Targeted

  • Colors
  • Categorization
  • Vocabulary

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4. Books

What You Need:

Your child's favorite book

How To Play: 

Books are very handy when practicing colors since pictures in books have so many colors. While reading a book with your child, focus on one or two colors. Tell your child what colors to be on the lookout for, and then, take turns finding objects that match the color.

Language Skills Targeted:

  • Colors
  • Categorization
  • Vocabulary
  • Following Directions

Tip:

Don’t try to do all the colors at once. This may be too confusing :)

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› Colors